Preparing Bulbs For Winter: How To Store Bulbs For Winter

Preparing Bulbs For Winter: How To Store Bulbs For Winter

By: Heather Rhoades

Whether you are storing tender summer blooming bulbs or more hardy spring bulbs that you did not get in the ground in time, knowing how to store bulbs for winter will ensure that these bulbs will be viable for planting in the spring. Let’s look at how to store garden bulbs over the winter.

Preparing Bulbs for Winter Storage

Cleaning – If your bulbs were dug up from the ground, gently brush off any excess dirt. Do not wash the bulbs as this can add excess water to the bulb and cause it to rot while you are storing bulbs for the winter.

Packing – Remove the bulbs from any plastic bags or containers. One of the things to keep in mind when you are learning how to store bulbs for winter is that if you store your bulbs in a material that cannot “breathe,” the bulbs will rot.

Instead, pack your bulbs in a cardboard box for storing bulbs for the winter. When preparing bulbs for winter, layer the bulbs in the box with newspaper in between each layer. In each layer of bulbs, the bulbs should not be touching one another.

Storing Bulbs for the Winter

Location – The proper way to store bulbs for winter is to choose a cool but dry location for your bulbs. A closet is good. If your basement does not get too damp, this is also a good choice. If you are storing spring blooming bulbs, the garage is also a good.

Special directions for spring blooming bulbs – If you are not storing spring blooming bulbs in the garage, consider storing bulbs for the winter in your refrigerator. Spring blooming bulbs need at least six to eight weeks of cold in order to bloom. By preparing bulbs for winter and then spring in your fridge, you can still enjoy a bloom from them. Plant them as soon as the ground thaws in the spring.

Check on them occasionally – Another tip for how to store garden bulbs over the winter is to check them about once a month. Squeeze each one gently and toss any that have become mushy.

Now that you know how to store garden bulbs over the winter, you can keep your bulbs safe from Old Man Winter and enjoy their beauty next year.

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Read more about General Bulb Care


How to Store Canna Bulbs for Winter

The Spruce / David Beaulieu

Canna is one of several tropical garden plants that can be grown in northern climates with specialized care. Technically, the roots of cannas are rhizomes, but they are commonly referred to as bulbs because the root structure closely resembles that of a classic plant bulb. In warm climates (USDA hardiness zones 8 to 10), canna bulbs can be left in the ground over winter, and the plants perform reliably as perennials, coming back year after year. However, north of zone 8, the bulbs will die if they spend winter in the ground. In colder climates, the plants are either treated as annuals and discarded at the end of the season, or the bulbs are dug up and stored for winter and replanted the following spring. Storing the bulbs is fairly quick and easy, depending on how many you have to dig up. However, they require some monitoring while they're in storage.


How to store lilies in the winter at home? First you need to do the preparation. Stems and leaves should not be pruned after flowering. This is necessary so that plants can bloom. Wilted shoots should be removed in late autumn. Lily will rest 1.5 months after the flower is planted. It is important to cut the ovary after flowering.

Do I need to dig lilies for the winter? This procedure is necessary to preserve the plant. When to dig lilies in the fall? This must be done with the first frost. Performing this work, it is necessary to cut the dry stem, leaving at least 5 cm from the soil level. Next, you need to cut off the circular slit with a pitchfork to protect against damage to the integrity of the bulb and root system. After that, carefully remove them from the ground.

Bulbs should be shaken off, washed with cold water and placed somewhere to dry. Experts advise to separate the gap with moss. It is important to carefully examine the flowers - whether there are diseases, rot, diseased places that should be trimmed. The pallet should be placed in a dark, cool place, where it will be dried for a couple of days. And at high temperatures there is a risk of mold.

After drying, it is necessary to dust the bulbs with fungicidal powder, and then place them in paper containers. You can wrap them in newspapers. In a cardboard box, you need to make holes for ventilation, put lilies with sawdust or moss, and then put them in the wintering place - in the garage, basement or balcony.


How to store tuberous begonias for the winter

By Dugald Cameron Filed Under: How to, October in the Garden

It seems a shame, but tuberous begonias are often flowering at their best in late summer, just when it’s time to bring them indoors. Like most bulbs, tuberous begonias need a period of dormancy – several months where it’s dry, dark and cool. My bulbs spend the winter in a dark corner of our basement. I discovered my storage trick by trial and error over the many, many years I’ve enjoyed these amazingly floriferous plants. It’s actually super simple.

It’s best if they first get nipped by frost. Wilted foliage is fine, but the the most important thing is to not let them freeze. Better to bring them in a little early. This tells the tubers it’s time to go dormant.

Be gentle with them at this time of year as their fragile, water-filled stems and swollen tubers are easily damaged. Begonia tubers have thin skins and a tiny nick or scrape can become an entry point for infection that will rot your tuber minimal handling is best. Bring them inside, pot and all, if they’re potted. If you planted them in the garden, leave as much of the root ball as you can manage. Cut the plants back a bit if they’re huge, but try to leave as much growth as you can.

Leave potted begonias in their pots. Those planted in the garden can be carefully cleaned of their surrounding soil and stored in dry vermiculite, sawdust or peat moss in open paper bags. A cool, dark spot is best. Now you let them dry out, and then remove the stem and foliage. By leaving your tuber unmolested, it can dry (ripen) slowly, forming the thicker skin that helps it retain the moisture it’ll need when it begins to sprout again.

Our modern, thermally efficient accommodations tend to be extremely dry in winter. Indoor humidity varies so check on your tubers from time to time. Give your potted tubers a bit of water if they’re starting to shrivel. Bagged tubers can be removed from their bags (media and all) and given a light misting of water.

Another good reason for these checkups is that your begonias may well start to wake up in February or March which is a good thing. I’ve all too often heard sad stories from begonia lovers with neglected tubers that have grown tall, thin white stems while in storage. This won’t kill them, but will give a poor performance that summer. An early awakening tuber can be restarted early indoors. Remember, with tuberous begonias, the earlier they start the sooner they’ll commence their superb, summer-long display. Besides, aren’t we all dying to get something growing in the depths of winter?

By now some of you may be wondering if this is worth all the bother. Well, you’ll know if your begonias were properly grown if the tuber is larger at the end of the season than when you started. If not, then they were missing something they need. An important lesson that, if acted upon, will make you a better gardener. If it has grown bigger it may be big enough to divide into two. Even an undivided tuber will produce a larger plant with more flowers. Like potatoes, begonias grow from tubers, can be divided provided each piece has an “eye”.


How to Store Dahlia Bulbs

Last Updated: February 27, 2020 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

There are 13 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 96% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

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A dahlia is a flowering plant that is grown from a tuberous bulb. Dahlias are grown by gardeners, both professionals and amateurs. It is possible to store dahlia bulbs over the winter, so that the bulbs can be replanted in the spring to produce more flowers. Remove the bulbs from the ground carefully and then select a well ventilated container to store them. Make sure to check the bulbs throughout the winter to make sure they're staying fresh.


How to Store Tulip Bulbs

This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

There are 16 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. This article received 28 testimonials and 96% of readers who voted found it helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 424,249 times.

Tulips are hearty flowers that bloom in full force in the springtime. Most times, tulips are best when their bulbs are left in the ground year round, but your climate may not cooperate. If you live in an area with warm winters or you bought bulbs in the spring, you may have to store your bulbs so they’re ready to bloom next season.


Watch the video: How To Dig Up And Store Dahlia Tubers Over The Winter