Mammillaria hahniana

Mammillaria hahniana

Succulentopedia

Mammillaria hahniana (Old Lady Cactus)

Mammillaria hahniana (Old Lady Cactus) is a cactus with solitary or clustered stems covered with dense white bristles and fine spines. It…


Mammillaria 'Superba'

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Mammillaria (mam-mil-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: hahniana (hahn-ee-AY-na) (Info)
Cultivar: Superba
Synonym:Mammillaria hahniana var. superba

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Vista, California(9 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Aug 20, 2010, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is one of those rare Mammillarias that look so beautiful that you are sure it'll drop dead in your care. but it is surprisingly hardy for all its perfection. It does not rot easily, thank goodness, as I rot about half the cactus I grow, and this one is doing great in mostly full sun, outdoors in southern California and does fine in cold wet winters and hot, dry summers. I bet it would be happier in a pot with more controlled environment, and ones I have seen in pots are amazing. good show plant. Amazing pure white cactus with long 'fur' and bright pink small flowers.

On Sep 15, 2008, AnalogDog from Mountlake Terrace, WA (Zone 8a) wrote:

A lovely shaggy Mamm, with hidden spines. Watch out. No special care necessary except for a free draining cacti mix, bright sunshine and plenty of water.


Old Lady Cactus

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Mammillaria (mam-mil-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: hahniana (hahn-ee-AY-na) (Info)
Synonym:Mammillaria hahniana subsp. hahniana
Synonym:Mammillaria hahniana var. hahniana

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Vista, California(9 reports)

Lake Mary, Florida(2 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Oct 12, 2008, aww07 from Siloam Springs, AR wrote:

I bought this plant yesterday at the low's garden center out of the 200 cactus's they had this one stood out the most it was so small and on sale for $1 it looked hariy and not very sharp but when i went to pick it up I recieve numberous needles in my hand. It is a very cute cactus though. I don't know how easy it is to grow i ready it was easy but i've only had it for a day so i dont know.

On Dec 27, 2005, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

Harry Johnson developed cultivars of m. hahniana and sold them by mail order in the early-to-mid 1900's.

When Harry's nursery was sold after his death in the late 1980s some of the specimens of m. hahniana that he used to develop the cultivars were made available. I submitted a picture of one of the ancestors to the present long-haired cultivars of m. hahniana. This specimen came directly from his nursery to our gardens.

It is grown here in container, which I find is the most successful way to grow clustering mams here. We have lost many mams to rot even in fast draining mounds growing out of pots. They seem to do much better in fast draining pots.

Of course, greenhousing is best, but that was in a different life. lol

On Mar 12, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

The differences between the subspecies are:
--ssp. hahniana has only 1 central spine and 20-30 radial spines per areole. Flowers are purplish-red.
--ssp. bravoae has 2 central spines and 28-30 radial spines per areole. Flowers are dark pink.
--ssp. mendeliana has 2-4 central spines and under-developed or zero radial spines. Flowers are pale pink.
--ssp. woodsii has 2 central spines and 25-30 radial spines per areole. Flowers are pink.

On Feb 22, 2005, hanna1 from Castro Valley, CA (Zone 9a) wrote:

Beautiful globular cactus is covered with white spines and dense white hair. Rings of vivid carmine flowers in Summer create dramatic contrast with white hairs. It is a native of Mexico. Bright light. Porous cactus soil. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

On Feb 22, 2005, cacti_lover from Henderson, NV (Zone 9b) wrote:

Contrary to the hardiness detail above, this cactus can survive to 25F. It is easy to grow, but rot prone if root is wet in winter. Flowers in late winter to mid spring depending on what zone it is in. The ring of pink flowers is pretty and can last for weeks, but each individual flowers last for only a few days.

On Apr 4, 2001, Ehowell from Weyburn, SK wrote:

This little cactus is very easy to grow. The round body has silky hairs and tiny white "cotton balls' all over it. The little pink flowers keep coming all winter in my south window.


Mammillaria hahniana

Plant does not flower in January

Plant does not flower in February

Plant does not flower in March

Plant does flower in April

Plant does not flower in June

Plant does not flower in July

Plant does not flower in August

Plant does not flower in September

Plant does not flower in October

Plant does not flower in November

Plant does not flower in December

  • Botanical name:Mammillariahahniana
  • Common name: Old lady cactus
  • Family: Cactaceae
  • Plant Type: Cactus or succulent, House plant, Evergreen

Mammillaria is a genus of spiny cacti native to the desert regions of Central America, particularly Mexico. Plants usually form clusters of spherical or columnar stems, and bear funnel-shaped flowers.

Known as the old lady cactus, Mammillaria hahniana forms globe-shaped stems covered in fine white spines and white down, from which a circle of pretty pink flowers appears in spring. It’s the perfect cactus for beginners and makes a fine addition to any cactus collection.

For best results grow Mammillaria hahniana in cactus compost in containers in full sun. Water from mid-spring to summer only, and feed once a month with a special cactus fertiliser. Like all cacti growing in a temperate climate, it’s best grown as a houseplant but containers may be moved to a sunny, sheltered patio in midsummer.


Watch the video: Mammillaria hahniana