Information About Cleyera

Information About Cleyera

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Japanese Cleyera Information: How To Care For A Cleyera Shrub

By Jackie Carroll

Due to excellent foliage color and neat rounded shape requiring little pruning, cleyera shrubs have become a southern garden standard. Read this article for info on how to care for a cleyera shrub.

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Mixed Screens

Factsheet | HGIC 1731 | Published: Aug 13, 2017 | Print

In the landscape, trees and shrubs are often used to create buffers and screens. On occasion, both may be used to frame a desirable view as well. Many plant species used are reliable performers, while others tend to lose popularity as they become unreliable in the landscape due to insect, disease, or cultural problems. The demand for the supply of new plantings perpetuates a constant ebb and flow in the horticultural market.

Leyland Cypress is an example of a plant commonly used as an evergreen screen planting for its uniformity and ability to provide a buffer for privacy, noise control, and as a windbreak. The Leyland Cypress planting model generally consists of using a single type of plant (termed monoculture) where plantings are oriented in one row with close and even spacing.

Leyland Cypress planted as a monoculture screen along a roadway.
LayLa Burgess, © 2017 HGIC, Clemson Extension

Leyland cypress trees are experiencing severe decline in many landscapes. Trees are being lost one by one, or several at a time in more severe cases because of disease or damaging pests in the monoculture planting system. When the choice of plantings are all the same, disease or insects that cause damage can be easily transferred laterally from plant to plant. However, many other potential factors contribute to plant health and decline such as drought and proper planting technique.

When individual plants in a screen die, it can be difficult to match the lost plant to the existing plantings. It should be possible to locate the same plant species or cultivar, but the once uniform and mature screen becomes dotted with smaller plants. This gives the appearance of being less manicured, less uniform, and may no longer function as an efficient screen. In essence, the once uniform screen is not so uniform anymore. One way to avoid this situation is to plant a mixed screen.

Multiple plant species in a mixed screen provide diversity and safeguard against potential insect and disease problems.
LayLa Burgess, © 2017 HGIC, Clemson Extension

A mixed screen moves away from the straight lined, monoculture design and instead uses groupings and layering of different types of plants. Mixed screens still provide all the functional aspects of privacy, noise control, and protection from prevailing winds, but in addition provide biodiversity to the landscape resulting in a number of benefits to plant health and longevity.


Hardiness and Growing Tips

The soil needs to be moist with good drainage for optimal growth. It needs to be acidic or at least neutral as alkaline soils can be problematic. Change your soil to be more acidic if the pH is not too much above neutral.

This shrub is best suited for USDA Zones 5-9. It is native to western North America. Partial shade is ideal for this species. It can also be grown in full shade or full sun, though too much light can cause foliage scorching. Try to find a planting location that offers some shelter from the wind. Since these are evergreen and do not drop in the fall, the leaves may dry out in the winter if the shrub is hit by wind often.

Propagation can be performed through the use of seed germination, taking cuttings, and dividing existing plants. The plant will also naturally propagate itself through cloning.

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

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The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova


HOW TO PLANT SPIREA

Double Play® Blue Kazoo® Spirea

When to plant:

Where to plant:

Make sure you have chosen a site that drains well and receives at least 6 hours of sun each day.

How to plant:

Dig a hole that is twice as wide as the container and just as deep. Remove the plant from its container and gently loosen any tightly wound roots. Place the plant in the hole and backfill with the excavated soil. Water thoroughly to settle the soil. Cover with a 2-3” layer of mulch, keeping it away from the stems.

Spacing:

Space spirea plants 2 to 15 feet apart, depending on the expected mature width of the plant and the application. To create dense, full spirea hedges, you can space your plants more closely together as long as you give them some elbow room.


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